Member Tree Giveaway

REGISTRATION IS LIVE! Registration can be found at the bottom of this page, or reserve your tree here!

What does a Mid-Atlantic forest look and feel like? It is full of tall trees like smooth beeches, towering tulip trees, and majestic oaks. Beneath them are smaller trees that fruit and flower, like the early flowering witch hazel and serviceberry or the fruiting American hazelnut and pawpaw. They provide shelter and food for the many creatures that call this area home. We have focused on this for the Member Tree Giveaway on April 23 as part of our Earth Day celebrations, April 11 to April 23.

This year, our trees are generously provided by the KeystoneTen Million Trees Partnership. Our mutual commitment is to plant as many trees in our community as possible to help sustain our ecosystem.

We ask that you register for your bare-root tree (or unpotted tree whose roots have been cleaned of soil) and pick it up on Saturday, April 23, by noon. All unclaimed trees will be distributed to walk-up visitors between noon and 1 pm.

Here’s what you need to do to get your tree:

Step One:

Registration is required to receive one tree. Registration begins April 11 and continues until all trees are claimed. Not a member? Become one here!

Review the five trees we are offering and select your tree. Please select only one tree out of the five choices available. Make sure that you have the conditions and room for the tree by reading the information provided. Trees are bare root trees and need to be planted immediately. We recommend bringing a bag to sleeve over the roots. Trees are two to four feet in height. For detailed planting instructions from Keystone Ten Million Trees Partnership, click Bareroot Planting Instructions.

Step Two:

Click “Get My Tree here.” Remember, one tree per household only. We want the 125 trees to get to 125 homes. We have 25 of each species.

The pickup location is in Tyler’s parking lot. You must bring your receipt or membership card with the person’s name reserving the tree. Staff and volunteers will be available to answer your questions. Please be patient as we anticipate a good turnout.

Step Three:

Take your tree home to plant ASAP. Water regularly for the first year.

The selections are:

American hazelnut, Corylus americana

Pawpaw, Asimina triloba

Common witch hazel, Hamamelis virginiana

Serviceberry, Amelanchier canadensis

Swamp white oak, Quercus bicolor

American hazelnut, Corylus americana

Not only are they a favorite food for wild turkeys, songbirds and squirrels, but humans love them too. The American hazelnut is a small tree (9 to 12 feet tall and 8 to 13 feet wide), perfect for the naturalistic garden or a garden that neighbors woods. Tolerant of full sun to light shade, the American hazelnut likes regular garden conditions. It won’t thrive in waterlogged soil. When happy, it will send out suckers and create a thicket.

American hazelnut, Corylus americana

Pawpaw, Asimina triloba

This is your chance to plant a native fruit tree! If you have a moist area, say next to a stream or in a low spot, even better. Pawpaw is a medium-sized, multi-trunked tree reaching 30 to 40 feet and spread as a colony to 30 feet wide. For best fruiting, make sure you have two different pawpaws. Flowers attract the Zebra Swallowtail butterfly in April, and when pollinated, fruits appear in September. Pick them quickly before the squirrels do! Fruits taste like ripe bananas and can be cooked with recipes calling for bananas.

Pawpaw, Asimina triloba

Common witch hazel, Hamamelis virginiana

The witch hazel is a tree like no other because it flowers in late fall, producing yellow, spidery, and fragrant flowers. This native tree is naturally found in woods under dappled shade and growing in rich soil. All it asks for is consistent moisture and room to spread out in your garden. It will reach 20 to 30 feet in height and 15 to 20 feet wide. Excellent for the woodland garden underplanted with ferns, foam flowers and wood phlox. Gorgeous yellow fall color.

Witch hazel, Hamamelis virginiana

Serviceberry, Amelanchier canadensis

Flowering from April to May, this small multi-stemmed tree (large shrub) is sure to add multi-seasonal interest to your garden and support local wildlife. It can reach up to 20 feet and is just as wide in the garden. Flowers give way to small, round, green berries that turn red, and mature to a dark purplish-black in early summer. Edible berries resemble blueberries in size and color and are used in jams, jellies, and pies. Place where it will get full sun to part shade with plenty of air circulation.

Serviceberry, Amelanchier canadensis

Swamp White Oak, Quercus bicolor

“Oaks are the quintessential wildlife plants: no other plant genus supports more species of Lepidoptera (butterflies), thus providing more types of bird food than the mighty oak.” – Doug Tallamy.

If you have the space for a majestic tree that will grow 50 to 60 feet tall and just as wide, plant this oak. It favors lowlands and moist areas with acidic soil and full sun. Its glossy green leaves will give way to a range of yellow to reddish-purple fall color.

Swamp white oak, Quercus bicolor

Click on the buttons below to reserve your tree, become a Tyler Member, or return to the main Earth Day page. Tree Reservations will begin on April 11. Have your membership information ready to log in. Happy Planting!

Reserve Your Tree: BEGINS APRIL 11
Become a Tyler Member
Return to Earth Day 2022